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What Are the Best Materials for a Sawtooth Roof?

Sawtooth roofs have a long history in industrial uses but have gradually become more popular in modern home designs. The name comes from the fact that alternating sections of the roof lay relatively flat or stand vertically, which creates the look of a jagged saw edge.

If you are considering a potential material replacement on your sawtooth roof, here are a few types to keep in mind.

Standing-Seam Metal

Standing-seam metal comes in long strips with a raised edge on one side. When strips of the metal are snapped together, the raised edges form a vertical seam between the strips. This layout helps whisk water away from the roof and also helps this type of material fit easily around the unconventional setup of a sawtooth roof.

Metal roofs are durable and energy efficient, which is ideal if heating and cooling costs are a concern. You will need to hire a company with experience laying metal roofs to ensure that the pieces are snapped together accurately and securely.

Metal roofing can be designed to resemble higher-end materials like slate or wood, but for a sawtooth-style roof, the industrial nature of metal might better suit the visual look.

Wood

Wood shingles are usually made of cedar and can be stained to match a variety of color needs. The shingles are staggered during installation due to their somewhat chunky body. The staggering helps water flow between the shingles rather than pooling on the surface, which also helps a sawtooth roof better drain off its horizontal sections.

Wood is a higher-maintenance material due to possible insect and weather damage. The material can offer some insulation assistance but also risks fueling a fire. The main advantage of wood is its beautiful appearance, which might not be a selling point if your sawtooth roof isn't very visible from street level.

Concrete

Flat concrete roofing is durable and affordable. The slope of sawtooth roofs is good for concrete because it is porous and thus tends to let water pool on a flat roof rather than slide off and into the gutter.

Concrete is relatively low maintenance from a damage standpoint, but dirt and debris can collect on the surface if you aren't experiencing rains. You might want to rinse the roof occasionally if it is visible from the street. 

Contact a service like Liberty Exteriors LLC for more advice about materials for a sawtooth roof or to set an appointment for the upgrade.


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